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by a cambridge electorate. at school, he was actually discouraged from pursuing a career in science. >> it was a completely ridiculous idea because there was no hope whatsoever of my doing science and then a time spent on it would be a total waste on my part and whoever had to teach me. but the nobel jury beg to differ. >> we now knew that -- know that development is not strictly a one-way street. >> there is hope that their work will pave the way for developing methods to diagnose and treat many diseases. >> to find out more about this, we are joined by our science correspondent. a lot of people around the world are working in stem cell research. why did these two get the prize? >> they got it for the same reason a lot of nobel prize laureates have gotten it -- they went against the currents. we used to believe that cell differentiation only went in one direction. you had these undifferentiated cells, stem cells, and then they became something in the course of development. in the embryo has a lot of them and they turn into bone, skin, liver. everyone thought it only went in one dir
. bush administration. he's now a professor of political science and public policy at duke university. we thank you both for being with us. peter feaver, to you first. we heard governor romney today criticize the president broadly for not rejecting strongly enough america's influence in the world. yet when it came to specifics, we didn't hear many details. so let me just ask you about a couple of different places in the world. what about when it comes to iran. what exactly governor romney be doing differently right now? >> well, this is the criticism that the obama campaign has leveled at the romney campaign for not being detailed and specific enough. when it comes to iran, the president hasn't laid out a red line that he said clearly he would enforce. when asked to be precise about what it means for iran not to possess a nuclear weapon, the articulation of the red line, he's been vague and says he doesn't want to parse it further. i think there's a certain element of ambiguity about where you would draw the line precisely so as to avoid being trapped by it. but the other point to make is
's not rocket science to believe that the president was disappointeted d in the expectations that he has for himself. >> tonight the anticipation growing, about the one and only debate between the vice-presidential nominee. gas prices may be high in your hometown, but they just hit a record in one state, and keep climbing. could what's driving up the cost in california happen closer to you? and a driver plows right into a liquor store, whoa. imagine being one of the people inside. and watching that struck get away. ♪ >> i'm harris falkner, we begin tonight in florida, with the republican presidential nominee for president spending a third straight day in that state which is up for grabs. governor mitt romney at an earlily in port st. lucie and he has a major address on foreign policy tomorrow at the virginia military institute and then the governor making a promise about taxes. >> a study came out this week that showed with all his spending, and all of his borrowing and all the interest on at that debt, that he will ultimately have to raise taxes on middle income families by 4,000 a y
professor are the winners of the nobel prize in science. the prize is $1.2 million that they will share. a quick reminder of our top story, hugo chavez has hailed his presidential electoion win as a continuance of his socialist revolution. stay with us. there's plenty more to come. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
could have a profound affect on how we treat heart disease. health and eye yens report -- and science reporter carolyn johnson has the story jie. even through a microscope there is no mistaking the rythmic beating. these cells were created in a bay area lab, and they helped researchers unlock the secrets of how a heart becomes a heart. >> it helps to have a blueprint to know what switches exist, how they are connected and would they turn on or shut off? >> so his team at san francisco's gladstone institute set out to map the genetic switches locked in the dna of embreonic stem cells to see how a stem cell becomes a heart cell. >> so these modifications are setting the right switches to turn genes on or off so that a heart cell in this case gains its heart identity. >> jeffrey alexzander coaxed the stem cells from mice to beating heart cells. the process done in a petri dish is growth factors that mimics the environment. it is not always a precise science. >> you know, my weekends sometimes would hinge on whether i came in and sold beating cells or not. >> wons they had enough of the b
on how we treat heart disease. health and eye yens report -- and science reporter carolyn johnson has the story jie. even through a microscope there is no mistaking the rythmic beating. these cells were created in a bay area lab, and they helped researchers unlock the secrets of how a heart becomes a heart. >> it helps to have a blueprint to know what switches exist, how they are connected and would they turn on or shut off? >> so his team at san francisco's gladstone institute set out to map the genetic switches locked in the dna of embreonic stem cells to see how a stem cell becomes a heart cell. >> so these modifications are setting the right switches to turn genes on or off so that a heart cell in this case gains its heart identity. >> jeffrey alexzander coaxed the stem cells from mice to beating heart cells. the process done in a petri dish is growth factors that mimics the environment. it is not always a precise science. >> you know, my weekends sometimes would hinge on whether i came in and sold beating cells or not. >> wons they had enough of the beating cells they began watch
the bet of the science research we can get on the space station. you have to bring in many cases samples, biological and pharmaceutical and material science experiments, they have to return samples to earth. >>trace: it will dock with the international space station on wednesday, stay there for three weeks and it before splashing de pacific ocean. >>shepard: there have been glitches? >>trace: the rocket which carries the capsule into space, it lost an engine on ascent and they had to rely on the other eight engines to get in orbit. nasa is very precise and will certainly want a full account from spacex about what happened. that could delay their next launch which is scheduled for january. spacex says the rockets are designed to be able to lose an engine and keep going. also, glitches happen. >> we will continue to always improve. we will learn from our flights and continue to improve the vehicle. given that we are looking toward flying crew on the vehicles, we want to make sure we address any and all items that we find and learn about it so we can make it more reliable. >>trace: spacex a
. each polling sort of public polling has their own art and science to likely voting and it is pretty much an art as it is a science a. lot of people had the art wrong going into the late primaries. that's why you saw early polls in the primaries being way off because you're hilikely voter didn't look like a electorate turned out. we had 11% of the general electorate in '08, so the screen was completely off. typically, you're going to undersample minorities and all these polls. that said, a big difference between a registered voter and likely voter, it's someone who says they're likely to vote high on their propensity up front on the phone call say they're going to vote and or they have some past performance in their background where they voted in one of the two or two of the three general elections. there's an art to this. on this point, i don't play the polling game back and forth, but a seven-point swing in party identification i think goes a long way to explain this. i know this is a story that the media wants to drive, but at the same time, you have a political out with a poll th
. another standout stock, gilead sciences is up 70% year-to-date, ubs has it as its top large tech biotech pick, it's attractively trading to a discount to the biotech sector, biogen up 50% in the past year thanks to its strong earnings performance and anticipation riding behind its multiple sclerosis drug bg12 which could get approval by year's end. another is buyout speculation. the firms are on the hunt for under the radar biotech firms, bristol-myers among others making big bets. andrew you've been following that as well. >> thank you for that report. lot of beta. see if there's any alpha. >>> in the next hour of "squawk box" former ubs american chairman robert wolf will join us to talk financials, jobs and the election, mr. obama's favorite banker. and later health care, a major issue for americans in the presidential candidates, the coo of mt. sinai, ken david, is going to join us. a crash management system and the world's only tridion safety cell which can withstand over three and a half tons. small in size. big on safety. which can withstand over three and a half tons. if we want t
, there is no science behind it. baseball just about controlling your heartbeat and you know, we did that today. >> now among the 47,000 people packing busch stadium yesterday there was also a group of vocal nats fans. game two against the cardinals starts at 4:37 p.m. and then our first home game of the series is of course on wednesday at noon. something i think all of us here in washington are looking forward to. mike and andrea? >> of course we are looking forward to it. >> that is going to be a tough ticket on get on wednesday. the success of all of our sports team in the region has been a good thing for local businesses. specifically you know at the sports bars and restaurants. the argonaut restaurant is one of countless places in our region where people gather to watch the ravens and redskins and nationals and orioles. sunday was the first day dc bars and restaurants could stay open until 4:00 in the morning, the day before columbus day as well as veteran's day, thanksgiving and christmas. >> i think dc is getting young and i guess hipper, as they say. i think people are out later now. when it is
was once science-fiction but a multi-user space port with horizontal launch and landing capabilities as well as the facilities that we have available from shuttle along with this outstanding work force that's available down here to help make that transition. >> now, the dragon capsule is carrying about 1,000 pounds of cargo, everything from food to scientific experiments. if for some reason, fredricka, they can't get off the ground foen tonight, if the weather interrupts them, they will try again tomorrow, which is tomorrow, columbus day. which is kind of fitting, exploration on columbus day. >> i see the title. sounds good. thanks so much. >>> it sounds impossible, but a seasoned skydiver is out to set a world record when he jumps out of a balloon 23 miles up. both presidential campaigns are aimed at undecided voters. we'll size up that important group. online outfit piccolo headphones buy now broadway show megapixels place to sleep little roadster war and peace deep sea diving ninja app hipster glasses 5% cash back sign up to get 5% everywhere online through december. only from dis
minds in aeronautical science to put this all together. so they do have everything planned out. what we're going to show you here are photo journalist mike love is going to pan over here. this is the field where they will launch a balloon with a cap actual that will take felix baumgartner. the balloon will take him to the edge of space. it's about 122,000 feet above the earth. at that point he's going to step out of that capsule and free fall for 117,000 feet wearing nothing but a high-pressure suit, a helmet, and a parachute. that's going to break the record for the longest free fall from space, and in doing so, don, he will also break the speed record. he's going to bre the sound barrier. he's going to go about 690 miles an hour. so those are two records he's going to break on this mission. >> wow. and that video is pretticle. it looks like a jellyfish, right? doesn't it look like a jellyfish. >> reporter: yeah, it does. it's something to see. >> this is really risky. >> reporter: it is very risky, don. there are a lot of things that could conceivably go wrong. we have talked to the e
that the president's agenda of investment in education, more math and science teachers, help for manufacturing in the u.s., reducing oil dependency and balance much trade deficit. melissa: all you've done is talking points. you haven't answer ad single question. we're out of time. could you anticipates one of the questions. >> melissa, here is the facts. the facts are, more people are going back to work. the unemployment rate is 7.8%. this is looking very much like 1984 and ronald reagan. unemployment down, people back to work. melissa: thanks for coming on the show. we appreciate your time. >> my pleasure. melissa: so there is big divide in the jobs data today, as we're discussing household survey shows total employment surged 873,000, but payroll says only 114,000 people went back to work. even jack welch said it, hard to reconcile these numbers. he tweeted, unbelievable jobs numbers. these chicago guys will do anything. can't debate so they change the numbers. that is harsh criticism. here with me is economist peter morici. which also have gary burtless, senior fellow? [no audio. what do yo
. this is all based on the norwegian university science and technology new study. you know those norwegians are very tidy. they don't want to pollute the environment. but they say global warming, potential of electric vehicle production is twice that of conventional vehicles is basically twice as bad is what they're trying to say. and number one, they say that in studies in the past they didn't consider the impact of charging the battery. that the generating of the electricity to charge the battery if it comes from a coal plant, comes from a nuclear plant, you're kind of defeating the purpose of having a cleaner vehicle because you used this other dirty way to make the electricity. what do you say? >> well, that would be true if the majority of our electricity was still coming from coal but we've had some radical changes in the electric generation sector in the united states over the last couple of years. driven primarily by steadily declining natural gas prices. as a result, for the first time in american history, we are generating more of our electricity today from natural gas than from c
science and he'll do a great job. >> reporter: and that's key here. the records mean a lot. but what this team wants to get out of this is the scientific and aerospace advancements. they want to see if that suit that felix is going to wear is going to be the next generation spacesuit, to see if people can survive outside a space vehicle inside event of a malfunction. >> what a soir, brian, thank you. >>> you're in "the situation room." happening now, mitt romney says president obama is leading from behind. but he isn't the first to use that description. we have the reporter who heard it first from a member of the obama administration. >>> we also have inside information about vice president joe biden's preparations for his crucial debate with paul ryan. and depending on how old you are, you're going to find out how much money you will need to save right now to have a comfortable retirement. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin this hour with mitt romney's declaration that the united st
, attention and enthusiasm, it matters which voters turn out where. dave robertson, a political science professor at the university of missouri st. louis, says the topsy-turvy election has cut both ways. >> one of the things akin has been able to do is electrify some of the conservative base. but there's a counter movement to that. and at is he's also helped electrify some of the female voters in the state, some of the moderate voters in the state, some of the key voters in the suburbs of this state that are going to determine the outcome of this election. and that's a real disadvantage for him. >> ifill: akin is counting on conservatives, home schooling parents, and evangelicals to rally around his cause. >> we don't tell you who to vote for, but i'm going to tell you how to vote. >> ifill: reverend stoney shaw, pastor of ferguson first baptist church, has known akin for 25 years. >> some of my family, my children were, "dad, how can you support him? everybody is turning against him." i said, "you know, there was another guy everybody turned against-- jesus christ-- but he prevailed. a
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. monarch of marketing analysis. with the ability to improve roi through seo all by cob. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. i'm going b-i-g. [ male announcer ] good choice business pro. good choice. go national. go like a pro. [ male announcer ] the exceedingly nimble, ridiculously agile, tight turning, fun to drive 2013 smart. ♪ >>> beer's going to have the fed minutes right at the top of the hour. then we're going to look at how big ben, the puppet master, pulls the strings behind the scenes of the central bank to get what he wants. >>> we're also going to take a look at the real jobs killers in america. we debate whether safety nets are really anchors on our economy. >>> what our kids should really be taught for all that money. lots of things coming up on street signs. back to "power lunch." >>> jamie dimon was one of wall street's heroes during the economic meltdown but his
with other cargo ships from russia, japan or -- they're going to put in science experiments, gear that maybe they could repair, or stuff that they want to send back down to friends or family, and that's going to come back down on october 28th, splash down into the pacific, spacex folks will pluck it out of the ocean and deliver the cargo back to nasa. it is first of its kind in unma bringing back more. i'm sure they're excited to get some chocolate vanilla swirl. >> ice cream aside, it is significant, they're able to bring cargo, this is the beginning of what i'm sure they hope will be an ability to ferry astronauts. chad and i covered the final retirement of the "atlantis," how long before the private entities are able to send astronauts so we don't have to rely on the soyuz. >> spacex planned to use this unmanned dragon spacecraft, to scale it up into a seven-person spaceship, that was their primary goal while they were building it. they always said and said last night that in three years they expect to be ready to fly humans on a version of this spacecraft. they are one of four companies
. there is some corals that live for many thousands of yeernz we found through some of the science we do we can drill holes down to the center of the corals and look at annual growth rings and we can look at when, in fact, when the first agriculture in australia happened, we saw a change in the type of chemistry that the annual growth rings and coral were depositing. so we have seen a chronology of increased siltation, of increased fertilization, of
on the science now in question. here's susan candiotti. >> reporter: former massachusetts chemist annie dookhan. >> could you tell us what happened. >> reporter: the state of massachusetts is accusing dookhan of tampering with drug evidence that could call into question at least 34,000 cases going back to 2003. 34,000. at the moment she faces only three charges. however, in boston alone, the d.a. estimates as many as 500 convicted felons could be set free. how big of a mess is this? >> at this point, susan, we don't know. >> reporter: at this lab now closed by the state dookhan allegedly mishandled drugs seized by police for evidence at trial. she allegedly estimated the amount of drugs at times by simply looking at them and certified some drugs as cocaine that are now testing negative. she didn't just write down the wrong thing. prosecutors accuse her of doctoring evidence to change test results. >> she would take known cocaine from an area that she knew was cocaine and actually add them to the sample to make it cocaine. >> incredible story. let's turn to cnn contributor paul callen for legal
night. a chief advisor was asked about it this morning. >> it is not rocket science to believe that the president was disappointed in the expectation that he has if himself. i think you are going to see a very engaged president that is ready and willing to call out whichever mitt romney shows up. >> the romney campaign is wondering which president obama will show up at the next debate. they expect he will be tough and forceful but it is a town-maul -- town-haul debate so there is a real fine line being bullying and forceful. >>heather: thank you, john roberts. >> president obama is spending the day in the biggest blue state, or one of them, california. he arrived for a private event in los angeles minutes ago. that will be followed by a "30 days to victory concert," in los angeles. a big roster of celebrity supporters. he will make remarks along with actor george clooney and here musical performances by jennifer hudson, katy perry and stevie wonder. >> one of the most closely watched u.s. senatations this year is in a dead heat. the outcome of the race could tilt the power of t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 63 (some duplicates have been removed)